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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 288-292

Association of stress, salivary cortisol level, and periodontitis among the inmates of a central prison in Kerala


1 Department of Periodontics, Amrita School of Dentistry, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kochi, Kerala, India
2 Department of Biochemistry, Amrita School of Medicine, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kochi, Kerala, India

Correspondence Address:
Angel Fenol
Department of Periodontics, Amrita School of Dentistry, AIMS, Edapally, Kochi - 682 041, Kerala
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1735-3327.211625

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Background: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the association between stress, salivary cortisol, and periodontitis among the inmates of the central prison. Materials and Methods: Seventy inmates were grouped depending on their pocket depth into Group A (pocket depth >4 mm and <6 mm), Group B (at least four sites with pocket depth ≥6 mm), and Group C (pocket depth ≤3 mm). The clinical parameters such as the oral hygiene index-simplified, gingival index, pocket depth, and the clinical attachment levels (CALs) were recorded. Stress was measured using the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale along with prison time served. Saliva samples were collected, and cortisol levels were determined using electrochemiluminescence assay. Chi-square test was used for finding the association between the clinical parameters. The correlation between clinical parameters, stress, salivary cortisol levels, and time served was done using Pearson's rank correlation coefficient. Results: The CALs, the stress score and the salivary cortisol levels were significantly higher in Group B (P < 0.001). Pearson's correlation showed a positive correlation between stress, cortisol level, and pocket depth. A positive correlation which was statistically significant was obtained between salivary cortisol level and prison time served by the inmates. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that there is a positive relation between stress and periodontal disease. The study suggests that salivary cortisol level can be used as a marker to assess stress.


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