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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 306-313

Selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor promotes bone healing


1 Department of Endodontics, Dental Research Center, School of Dentistry, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 Department of Oral Pathology, Implant Research Center, School of Dentistry, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
3 Orthopaedic Surgeon, Private Practice, Isfahan, Iran
4 Department of Endodontics, Dental Materials Research Center, School of Dentistry, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
5 Dental Research Center, School of Dentistry, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Neda Shekarchizade
Department of Endodontics, Dental Materials Research Center, School of Dentistry, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1735-3327.215965

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Background: Nitric oxide (NO) has many functions in wound healing and bone metabolism. This study sought to assess the local effect of aminoguanidine (AG), a selective inducible NO synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, on the rate of bone healing. Materials and Methods: This experimental interventional study was conducted on 36 rats, which were randomly divided into three groups of control, placebo, and AG. Bone defects measuring 5 mm × 5 mm were created in the femur. In control group, bone defects remained empty. A placebo gel was applied to defects in the placebo group. AG gel was placed in bone defects in AG group. New bone formation and healing were assessed using histological and histomorphometric analyses. The healing score and the percentage of new bone formation (total bone mass, immature bone, and mature bone) were compared among the three groups using the Kruskal–Wallis test and analysis of variance, respectively. A P < 0.05 was statistically significant. Results: The mean healing score in AG group (3.17 ± 0.577) was significantly higher than that in control (2.67 ± 0.49) and the placebo (2.58 ± 0.515) groups (P = 0.036). The percentage of new mature (lamellar) bone in AG group (22.06 ± 1.90) was significantly higher than that in control (20.94 ± 2.03) and the placebo (20.53 ± 1.20) groups (P = 0.008). Conclusion: The rate of bone healing was faster in the AG compared to the other two groups. Local application of selective iNOS inhibitors like AG may be efficient as an adjunct in the clinical setting where local bone formation is required.


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