Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 472
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 344-350

Microbial microleakage assessment of class V cavities restored with different materials and techniques: A laboratory study


1 Dental Research Center, School of Dentistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
2 Antimicrobial Resistance Research Center, Medical School, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
3 Health Sciences Research Center, Medical School, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
4 Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Birjand University of Medical Sciences, Birjand, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Ali Bagherian
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Park Square, Mashhad
Iran
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1735-3327.215958

Rights and Permissions

Background: The aim of this study was to compare microbial microleakage of class V cavities restored with different materials and techniques using a microbial leakage assessment method. Materials and Methods: One hundred extracted, caries-free, human maxillary premolars were randomly divided into five groups. Group 1: Resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), Group 2: Closed sandwich with flowable composite + nanohybrid composite, Group 3: Nanohybrid composite, Group 4: Closed sandwich with RMGI + nanohybrid composite, and Group 5: Flowable composite + nanohybrid composite that were co-cured together (“snow-plow” technique). A microbial penetration method utilizing Streptococcus mutans as an indicator was tested for leakage assessment. Data were analyzed and the significance level was α =0.05. Results: The log-rank test indicated a statistically significant difference in leakage rates among the five groups (P = 0.008). Mantel–Cox log-rank test indicated statistically significant differences in microleakage rates between Groups 1 and 3 (P = 0.029), between Groups 2 and 5 (P = 0.005), and between Groups 3 and 5 (P = 0.002). Conclusion: With respect to the limitations of an in vitro study, our findings suggest that adding a thin layer of flowable composite or RMGI under nanohybrid composite in class V cavities did not decrease the bacterial leakage rate, whereas use of the “snow-plow” technique caused an increase in the microleakage rate.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1009    
    Printed12    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded113    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal