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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 20

Effect of casein-phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate and fluoride with/without erbium, chromium-doped yttrium, scandium, gallium, and garnet laser irradiation on enamel microhardness of permanent teeth


1 Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran
2 Private Office, Tehran, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Arezoo Ghelejkhani
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1735-3327.311427

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Background: Laser therapy, along with the use of fluoridated compounds is a novel technique suggested for caries prevention. Casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) is another product suggested for this purpose. This study compared the effect of CPP-ACP and fluoride with/without Erbium, chromium-doped yttrium, scandium, gallium, and garnet laser irradiation on enamel microhardness of permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: This in vitro experimental study evaluated 35 extracted third molars. The teeth were decoronated, and the crowns were split into buccal and lingual halves. The samples were randomly divided into seven groups (n = 10) of GC Tooth Mousse, MI Paste Plus, laser, fluoride varnish, laser + GC Tooth Mousse, laser + MI Paste Plus, and laser + fluoride varnish. The baseline microhardness was measured before the intervention. After the intervention, the samples were kept in artificial saliva for 1 h and were then immersed in the demineralizing solution for 3 h followed by 21 h of immersion in the remineralizing solution for a total period of 12 days. Finally, the teeth were kept in the remineralizing solution for 2 more days. The secondary microhardness of the teeth was then measured. Data were analyzed using the Shapiro–Wilk test, two-way ANOVA, and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference test. Results: The fluoride varnish (14.31%) and laser + fluoride varnish (18.79%) groups experienced minimum reduction in microhardness, while the GC Tooth Mousse group experienced maximum reduction in microhardness (91.64%) (P < 0.001). Laser irradiation before the application of remineralizing agents increased the microhardness only in laser + GC Tooth Mousse group (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Fluoride varnish increased the enamel microhardness, while GC Tooth Mousse had no such effect. Laser therapy before the application of remineralizing agents did not significantly enhance enamel resistance to demineralization.


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