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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 21

Surface characterization and frictional force between stainless steel brackets and archwires in orthodontic patients using chlorhexidine- and Persica-containing mouthrinses: A randomized controlled trial


1 Orthodontist, Private Practice, Dental Research Center, Dentistry Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2 Department of Orthodontics, Dental Research Center, Dentistry Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
3 Department of Dental Biomaterials, School of Dentistry/Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
4 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiologist, Private Practice, Tehran, Iran
5 Dental Research Center, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Tabassom Hooshmand
Department of Dental Biomaterials, School of Dentistry/Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, North Kargar Street, Tehran 14174
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1735-3327.313116

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Background: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of chlorhexidine- and Persica-containing mouthrinses on the surface characterization of orthodontic appliance and friction between the orthodontic stainless steel wires and brackets. Materials and Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 75 orthodontic patients (aged 13–30) were allocated (n = 25) into two experimental groups (prescribed by Persica- or chlorhexidine-containing mouthrinse) and one control group (no prescription). The ovoid stainless steel archwires were placed, and the maxillary first premolar stainless steel edgewise brackets were ligated to wires by elastomeric rings. The patients were recalled after 2 weeks, and then, the archwires were removed and replaced. The surface analysis of archwires and brackets was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The frictional forces between the archwires and brackets were measured using a universal testing machine. The data for surface roughness were analyzed by the nonparametric Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. The frictional forces data were analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test using SPSS software. The level of significance was P < 0.05. Results: The retrieved brackets showed minor changes in their surface topography. The surface roughness of archwires after the intervention was significantly greater for the chlorhexidine than that of Persica (P < 0.05). The friction force between the archwires and brackets was also significantly higher for the chlorhexidine than that of Persica (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The Persica-containing mouthrinse from the biomechanical and biochemical standpoints may be a better option for oral hygiene in orthodontic patients compared with the chlorhexidine.


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